Making Peace Vigil

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Archive for October, 2010

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS FILM FESTIVAL

Posted by strattof on October 21, 2010

TUESDAY OCTOBER 26, 7:30 pm

GHOSTS (Canada 2009, 53 min)

The name “Maher Arar” is now well-known in Canada. Less familiar are the stories of three other Canadians–Muayyed Nureddin, Abdullah Almalki, and Ahmad El Maati–who were also tortured with the complicity of the Canadian government. Winner of the Audience Choice Award at the Montreal Human Rights Watch Festival, Ghosts follows the three men over a one-year period as they seek answers from the Canadian government. *Under One Sky: Voices of Youth  will also be screened.

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 27, 7:30 pm

BURMA VJ (Denmark 2008, 84 min)

Armed with video-cameras, a tenacious band of Burmese reporters face down death to expose the repressive regime controlling their country. Winner of over 40 international awards, Burma VJ was also nominated for the 2009 Oscar for best documentary. *With special guest speaker from the Canadian Friends of Burma

THURSDAY OCTOBER 28, 7:30 pm

UNDER RICH EARTH (Canada 2008)

In a remote mountain valley in Equador, coffee and sugarcane farmers resist the prospect of being forced off their land to make way for a Canadian mining project. In a world dominated by news of massacres and terrorism, Under Rich Earth is a surprising and poignant tale of hope and determination.

UNIVERSITY OF REGINA, CLASSROOM BUILDING 112

Free Admission

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VIGIL PARTICIPATES IN RED TENT CAMPAIGN

Posted by strattof on October 14, 2010

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HOMELESSNESS: CANADA’S HIDDEN PROBLEM

Posted by strattof on October 14, 2010

CANADA’S HOUSING CRISIS: FACTS AND FIGURES

3 million:  Number of Canadians who live in inadequate dwellings or face unaffordable shelter costs

150,000–300,000: Number of Canadians who are homeless–living on the street, in abandoned buildings, or in other out of the way locations

450,000–900,000: Number of hidden homeless people across the country

HIDDEN HOMELESSNESS

Most of us don’t see the 75% of homeless Canadians who live in cars, sleep on couches or floors of family or friends, or find temporary beds in church basements, empty buildings, shelters, rooming houses, or hotels.  The hidden homeless include: ●single men ●single mothers ●seniors on fixed incomes ●Aboriginal and immigrant families ●adults with poorly paying jobs ●women fleeing abuse ●young people who cannot get a foothold in the job market ●individuals with mental health issues ●those struggling to overcome addiction. The hidden homeless could be a relative or a friend. They could be you or me. A recent Salvation Army survey reported one in five Saskatchewan adults having come close to or actually experiencing homelessness at some time in their life.

HOMELESSNESS IS UNHEALTHY AND COSTLY

  • People’s ability to find and afford good quality housing is crucial to their overall health and well-being, and is a telling index of the state of a country’s social infrastructure. According to Dr. David Butler-Jones, Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer, “Shelter is a basic need for optimal health. Inadequate housing can result in numerous negative health outcomes, ranging from respiratory disease and asthma due to moulds and poor ventilation, to mental health impacts associated with overcrowding.”
  • The costs of homelessness affect us all. A report from the Canadian Senate estimates that Canadians are spending about $1 billion a year in taxes to deal with the homelessness crisis.

 RED TENT CAMPAIGN TO END HOMELESSNESS

Our Making Peace Vigil supports the Red Tent campaign to end homelessness and create affordable housing for all Canadians. Red Tent has designated this coming Tuesday, October 19, as the Canada Day of Action on Housing.

Red Tent is a national campaign that uses red tents as a symbol to draw attention to Canada’s housing crisis and mobilize people to pressure governments to take action on homelessness.  See http://www.redtents.org/ for more information.  

 

SUPPORT BILL C-304

Bill C-304 is an Act to ensure secure, adequate, accessible, and affordable housing for Canadians. A private member’s bill, it was introduced into the House of Commons in 2009 by Libby Davies, MP for Vancouver East.

(To find out more about Bill C-304, go to www2.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=3660878&Language=e&Mode=1&File=33)

Take action to end homelessness by showing your support for Bill C-304. The House will soon vote on the Bill. Sign and send the petition on the other side of this leaflet and encourage your Member of Parliament to support Bill C-304. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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RIDER FANS FOR PEACE

Posted by strattof on October 10, 2010

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REMEMBERING MISSING AND MURDERED ABORIGINAL WOMEN

Posted by strattof on October 1, 2010

582 Aboriginal girls and women have been murdered or gone missing in Canada since 1970. 61 of the cases are from Saskatchewan. Aboriginal women are the most at-risk group for violence in Canada. 

On Monday October 4th a vigil to remember and honour the murdered and missing women will be held in front of the CBC building, 2440 Broad Street, at 6:30 pm. Everyone is welcome.   

“Despite assurances to the contrary, police in Canada have often failed to provide Indigenous women with an adequate standard of protection.”

                                         Amnesty International: 2004 Stolen Sisters report

FACT SHEET

  • As of March 31 2010, there were 582 recorded cases of missing or murdered Aboriginal girls and women in Canada.
  • 20 of the cases occurred in the past year. 226 of the cases occurred in the past 10 years.
  • Most of the women (393) were murdered. 115 of the women are still missing.
  • Only 53% of the cases involving murder have been solved. 84% of homicides against non-Aboriginal women are solved.
  • 16.5% of the women were killed by a stranger. Only 6% of non-Aboriginal women are killed by strangers. Aboriginal women are almost three times more likely to be killed by a stranger than non-Aboriginal women.
  •  60% of the women and girls were killed in an urban area, 28% in rural areas, and 13% on-reserve.
  • 55% of the cases involve women and girls under the age of 31, with 17% being 18 years of age and under.
  • 88% of missing and murdered Aboriginal women were mothers. More than 440 children have been impacted by the loss of their mother.
  • 61 of the cases are from Saskatchewan.
  • With a 78% solution rate, Saskatchewan has the best record of any province in solving cases of murdered Aboriginal women. Still, 22% of Saskatchewan cases remain unsolved.
  • The percentage of Aboriginal women and girls who were murdered by strangers in Saskatchewan (36%) is significantly higher than the national percentage (16.5%).
  • 59% of missing women and girls in Saskatchewan are of Aboriginal ancestry (17 of 29 cases). Considering that Aboriginal people represent only 15% of the population in Saskatchewan, this figure is significant.

SISTERS IN SPIRIT

All the figures in this leaflet are taken from the website of Sisters In Spirit, a research initiative of the Native Women’s Association of Canada. The main objective of the initiative is “to address violence against Aboriginal (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) women, particularly… violence perpetrated against Aboriginal women because of their gender and Aboriginal identity.” Since 2005, Sisters in Spirit has been documenting and reporting on cases of missing and murdered Aboriginal girls and women.

TAKE ACTION

  • Learn more about the work of Sisters in Spirit by going to: http://www.nwac.ca/programs/sisters-spirit
  • Familiarize yourself with Amnesty International’s Stolen Sisters report: www.amnesty.ca/stolensisters/amr2000304.pdf
  • Contact your MP and urge him to lobby for an independent inquiry into the 207 official unsolved murder cases of Aboriginal girls and women.
  • Honour the lives of missing and murdered Aboriginal women by attending the vigil on October 4th in front of the CBC building, 2440 Broad Street, at 6:30 pm.

“The over-representation of Aboriginal women in Canada as victims of violence must be understood in the context of a colonial strategy that sought to dehumanize Aboriginal women.”

                                                         Sisters in Spirit: 2010 Research Findings

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