Making Peace Vigil

Standing up for peace

REMEMBERING MISSING AND MURDERED ABORIGINAL WOMEN

Posted by strattof on October 1, 2010

582 Aboriginal girls and women have been murdered or gone missing in Canada since 1970. 61 of the cases are from Saskatchewan. Aboriginal women are the most at-risk group for violence in Canada. 

On Monday October 4th a vigil to remember and honour the murdered and missing women will be held in front of the CBC building, 2440 Broad Street, at 6:30 pm. Everyone is welcome.   

“Despite assurances to the contrary, police in Canada have often failed to provide Indigenous women with an adequate standard of protection.”

                                         Amnesty International: 2004 Stolen Sisters report

FACT SHEET

  • As of March 31 2010, there were 582 recorded cases of missing or murdered Aboriginal girls and women in Canada.
  • 20 of the cases occurred in the past year. 226 of the cases occurred in the past 10 years.
  • Most of the women (393) were murdered. 115 of the women are still missing.
  • Only 53% of the cases involving murder have been solved. 84% of homicides against non-Aboriginal women are solved.
  • 16.5% of the women were killed by a stranger. Only 6% of non-Aboriginal women are killed by strangers. Aboriginal women are almost three times more likely to be killed by a stranger than non-Aboriginal women.
  •  60% of the women and girls were killed in an urban area, 28% in rural areas, and 13% on-reserve.
  • 55% of the cases involve women and girls under the age of 31, with 17% being 18 years of age and under.
  • 88% of missing and murdered Aboriginal women were mothers. More than 440 children have been impacted by the loss of their mother.
  • 61 of the cases are from Saskatchewan.
  • With a 78% solution rate, Saskatchewan has the best record of any province in solving cases of murdered Aboriginal women. Still, 22% of Saskatchewan cases remain unsolved.
  • The percentage of Aboriginal women and girls who were murdered by strangers in Saskatchewan (36%) is significantly higher than the national percentage (16.5%).
  • 59% of missing women and girls in Saskatchewan are of Aboriginal ancestry (17 of 29 cases). Considering that Aboriginal people represent only 15% of the population in Saskatchewan, this figure is significant.

SISTERS IN SPIRIT

All the figures in this leaflet are taken from the website of Sisters In Spirit, a research initiative of the Native Women’s Association of Canada. The main objective of the initiative is “to address violence against Aboriginal (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) women, particularly… violence perpetrated against Aboriginal women because of their gender and Aboriginal identity.” Since 2005, Sisters in Spirit has been documenting and reporting on cases of missing and murdered Aboriginal girls and women.

TAKE ACTION

  • Learn more about the work of Sisters in Spirit by going to: http://www.nwac.ca/programs/sisters-spirit
  • Familiarize yourself with Amnesty International’s Stolen Sisters report: www.amnesty.ca/stolensisters/amr2000304.pdf
  • Contact your MP and urge him to lobby for an independent inquiry into the 207 official unsolved murder cases of Aboriginal girls and women.
  • Honour the lives of missing and murdered Aboriginal women by attending the vigil on October 4th in front of the CBC building, 2440 Broad Street, at 6:30 pm.

“The over-representation of Aboriginal women in Canada as victims of violence must be understood in the context of a colonial strategy that sought to dehumanize Aboriginal women.”

                                                         Sisters in Spirit: 2010 Research Findings

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One Response to “REMEMBERING MISSING AND MURDERED ABORIGINAL WOMEN”

  1. […] in Afghanistan or Somalia. Over here, the scars of colonialism are still visible… and painful. REMEMBERING MISSING AND MURDERED ABORIGINAL WOMEN Making Peace Vigil The above link is a quick example of how the situation is where I live. […]

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