Making Peace Vigil

Standing up for peace

CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE UNDER ATTACK

Posted by strattof on June 15, 2017

According to Mayor Michael Fougere, “there is never ever a time for civil disobedience.” Gandhi, whose statue is in front of Regina City Hall, would disagree. Employing the methods of civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence from British colonial rule.

What exactly is civil disobedience? It has four key characteristics:

  1. Civil disobedience is the breaking of the law in order to protest unjust laws or government policies.
  2. Civil disobedience is non-violent.
  3. The goal of civil disobedience is to instigate a lasting change in law or policy.
  4. People who engage in civil disobedience are willing to accept the legal consequences of their actions.

Civil disobedience has proven to be an effective tool for bringing change. Is Mayor Fougere right that it is “never ever” justified?

MARTIN LUTHER KING & ROSA PARKS

In the 1950s, Martin Luther King, Rosa Parks, and other civil rights activists began their struggle against Jim Crow laws—laws that required racial segregation in schools, buses, restaurants, and restrooms. One of their tools was civil disobedience.

As a result of their actions, the Civil Rights Act was passed in 1964, an act that outlaws racial segregation.

Does Mayor Fougere think that Martin Luther King and other members of the US civil rights movement were unjustified in their acts of civil disobedience?

VIOLA DESMOND, CANADA’S OWN ROSA PARKS

In 1946, nine years before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Montgomery Alabama, Viola Desmond, an African Canadian, refused to leave the whites-only area of a segregated Nova Scotia movie theatre. In the end, police forcibly removed her from the theatre and jailed her.

Viola Desmond’s case inspired the Nova Scotia Civil Rights movement.

What is Mayor Fougere’s view of this act of civil disobedience? Does he think it should “never ever” have happened?

The Government of Canada is clear in its view. It is celebrating Viola Desmond for her act of civil disobedience by featuring her on the Canadian $10 bill, where, in 2018, she will replace John A. Macdonald.

Learn more about Viola Desmond by googling her name.

CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE & THE ELIMINATION OF STC 

CONTEXT OF FOUGERE’S “NEVER EVER”

  • On May 31, six people practiced civil disobedience by refusing to get off the last STC bus to arrive in Saskatoon from Regina before the provincial government shut down the service. They were arrested and taken off the bus in handcuffs.
  • In response to this act of civil disobedience, Ward 3 City Councillor Andrew Stevens tweeted: “Civil disobedience is important.”
  • Mayor Fougere responded to these two events with his “never ever” comment.

STC CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE JUSTIFIED

  1. The elimination of STC is an unjust policy in that it affects poor people disproportionately: 70% of STC users were low-income.
  2. The elimination of STC is not only an unjust policy. It may also be a matter of life and death, as Indigenous peoples were among frequent STC users. In BC, the absence of a rural bus service resulted in the Highway of Tears.
  3. The elimination of STC is also an unjust policy in that, as a Crown Corporation, STC belonged to the people of Saskatchewan who were not consulted about its elimination.
  4. Civil disobedience was a last resort. Many legal avenues of protest (rallies, letter writing, court challenges) had already been taken in an attempt to stop the elimination of STC.

CIVIL OBEDIENCE

The greatest danger to society is civil obedience —the submission of the individual conscience to governmental authority.—Howard Zinn

CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE: REGINA

UNJUST LAWS & POLICIES

Mayor Fougere seems to think there are no unjust laws or policies in Regina. Two City Councillors agree with him: Ward 2 Councillor Bob Hawkins and Ward 7 Councillor Sharron Bryce.

Perhaps the Mayor and Councillors are blinded by their white, upper-middle class privilege.

4 EXAMPLES OF UNJUST LAWS OR POLICIES

  1. The refusal of Regina City Council to do anything substantial to address Regina’s homelessness crisis
  2. The City bylaw prohibiting sleeping in city parks—a law that discriminates against homeless people
  3. The Unwanted Guest policy, an initiative of Regina Police Service, that allows business owners to ban individuals from their property: The targets of this policy are clearly poor people, Indigenous people, and people with mental health or addiction issues.
  4. Regina Police Service practice of street checks—that is “randomly” stopping people to collect information: Studies show that Indigenous people are much more likely to be stopped than non-Indigenous people.

TAKE ACTION

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: