Making Peace Vigil

Standing up for peace

WHY WE STAND WITH OMAR KHADR

Posted by strattof on July 31, 2017

Why did the Canadian government apologize to Omar Khadr and pay him $10.5 million? The main answer to this question is that previous Canadian governments—both Liberal and Conservative —broke Canadian, as well as international law, in their treatment of Omar Khadr following his capture by US forces in Afghanistan in 2002.

Some Canadians are angry about the apology and settlement. We at Making Peace Vigil (the folks who hand out pamphlets on peace and justice issues on the Scarth Street Mall every Thursday) are happy about it. Please have a look at our reasons, outlined inside this pamphlet, for choosing to stand with Omar Khadr.

6 REASONS FOR STANDING WITH OMAR KHADR 

1. OMAR KHADR WAS A CHILD SOLDIER

  • Omar Khadr was 15 when he was captured by the US military in Afghanistan in 2002, during a firefight in a compound.
  • The US imprisoned him first in Bagram in Afghanistan (2 months) and then in Guantánamo Bay in Cuba (10 years).
  • The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child defines “child” as a “human being below the age of eighteen.”
  • Canada ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1991, yet the Canadian government did not attempt to get Omar Khadr out of either Bagram or Guantánamo Bay prisons.
  • When, in 2012, Canadian courts finally forced the Canadian government to repatriate Omar Khadr, the government, rather than ensuring his release and rehabilitation, had him incarcer-ated in Canadian prisons for the next three years, until 2015.

2. OMAR KHADR WAS TORTURED

Confessions were extracted from Omar Khadr through the use of torture and other prohibited treatment, including beatings, threats of rape, and prolonged solitary confinement.

In 2003, the Canadian government became directly involved in the torture when it twice sent CSIS agents to Guantánamo to interrogate Omar Khadr, knowing that US officials had subjected him to prolonged sleep deprivation and isolation.

Canada signed the UN convention against torture in 1975.

3. OMAR KHADR IS A CANADIAN CITIZEN

Born in Toronto in 1986, Omar Khadr is a Canadian citizen and hence has the right to be protected by Canadian law.

In January 2010, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled unanimously that the Canadian government had violated Omar Khadr’s rights under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms when it sent CSIS agents to interrogate him under “oppressive circumstances” and then shared the information with US officials.

4. RESPECT FOR THE RULE OF LAW

In its treatment of Omar Khadr, the Canadian government showed contempt for both international and Canadian law.

  • Basic human rights (the right not to be tortured, for example) depend on all governments respecting international law.
  • The proper functioning of Canadian democracy depends on the Canadian government respecting the Canadian rule of law.

With the apology and settlement, the Canadian government finally showed some respect for the rule of law and Omar Khadr finally received some of the justice he deserves.

5. THE QUESTION OF GUILT

The main charge against Omar Khadr is that he threw the grenade that killed a US soldier, Sgt. Christopher Speer. There is no compelling evidence to support this charge.

  • No one saw who threw the grenade.
  • Omar Khadr was himself found lying under a pile of rocks and rubble, unarmed and severely wounded.
  • There is evidence that Sgt. Speer was a victim of friendly fire.

In 2010, facing indefinite incarceration, Omar Khadr entered into a plea bargain. In exchange for repatriation to Canada, he pleaded guilty to murdering Sgt. Speer. This coerced confession, which he has since retracted, is the main evidence against him. s

Besides, Omar Khadr was a (child) soldier in a war zone. The US soldiers who wounded him weren’t charged with attempted murder —or with murder for killing everyone else in the compound.

The whole point of war is to kill (murder) the enemy. War is evil.

6. HUMAN SYMPATHY

  • Child in a war zone. ●Witness to unspeakable horrors. ●Badly wounded—a shoulder injury that has required extensive surgery and permanent loss of sight in one eye. ●Youth spent in prison, most of it in notorious Guantánamo Bay. ●Victim of years of torture.

This was Omar Khadr’s life from the age of 10 – 28. None of it happened of his own volition.

STAND WITH OMAR KHADR

1. Sign the I STAND WITH OMAR KHADR petition: https://act.leadnow.ca/i-stand-with-omar-khadr/

2. Share this pamphlet with your friends and family.

3. Let Prime Minister Trudeau and your MP know you support the government’s apology to and settlement with Omar Khadr:

PM Trudeau: justintrudeau@parl.gc.ca or 613-922-4211

Ralph Goodale: ralph.goodale@parl.gc.ca or 306-585-2202

Andrew Sheer: andrew.scheer@parl.gc.ca or 306-332-2575

Erin Weir: erin.weir@parl.gc.ca or 306-790-4747

4. MARK YOUR CALENDAR: Dennis Edney, Omar Khadr’s lawyer, will be speaking in Regina—Monday September 25, 7:30 pm, Education Auditorium, U of R: The Rule of Law in an Age of Fear.

5. Learn More about Omar Khadr:

  • Watch the documentary You Don’t Like the Truth: 4 Days Inside Guantánamo, available on You Tube.
  • Watch the CBC documentary Omar Khadr: Out of the Shadows, available online.
  • Read Roméo Dallaire’s They Fight Like Soldiers, They Die Like Children, available at Regina Public Library.
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